ScoUK.net
PlusNET - The Smarter Way to Internet!
Home Rallying Subaru Impreza Colin McRae MBE Projects Entertainment Photo Gallery Contact Directory
 ScoUK.net > subaru-impreza > Special Edtions - RB320 P2 UK300 P1 WR1 RB5 22B Translate:     
Monday, 1 September, 2014 - 12:09 (UK)  

 Subaru Impreza




Subaru Impreza Story
An Introduction to the Subaru Impreza


History of the Impreza
A complete History of Subaru and the Impreza


Special Editions
All the UK special edition Impreza's listed here


My 2001 Impreza WRX
My own 2001 Impreza WRX in Red Mica


Project PPP
Upgraded my WRX with PPP saving nearly £1,200!


Scooby @ Lochindorb
Photo gallery of the car at Lochindorb Jan08


Photo Gallery
MY08 Impreza (Gallery)
MY06 Impreza (Gallery)
MY03 Impreza (Gallery)

 

Search the web



My Other Sites

 
ScoUK.net
You are here :)

MorayScoobies.co.uk
Local Regional website for Subaru Impreza Drivers Club Members

Broadband4 Lhanbryde.co.uk
Campaign website devoted to bringing ADSL Broadband to Lhanbryde

MorayIAM.org.uk
Moray Group of Advanced Motorists

motoringBible.com
on-line resource of motoring related articles sent in by visitors

MorayRoadSafety
Motoring website helping to make Moray roads a little bit safer for all! -

Support .sco TLD
www.dotsco.org

..:: The Subaru Impreza Story

1. The Subaru Impreza Story, as told by me
2. The History of the Subaru Impreza
3. Special Editions
4. Image Galleries
5. My 2001 Subaru Impreza WRX - Red Mica


..:: Special Editions - RB320, P2, WR1, UK300, P1, RB5, 22B & more

Here we have the complete list of Special Edition Subaru Impreza's were/are available in the UK. There have been many more editions released world wide, but here is the list of UK models along with there specifications.

       

 RB320 - 2007

November 2006, exactly one year after the sad death of Richard Burns from a brain tumour. Subaru UK announced a new special edition of their MY06 Subaru Impreza WRX STi. The RB320 is packaged in Obsidian black, with bespoke black alloys. May not be to everyone's liking but I think it looks fantastic and appropriate for the anniversary. The RB320 is no limited edition paint job, as the name suggests the RB320 delivers around 320bhp from it's WRX STi PPP package. That's a lot of oomph!! Added to that just about every subaru/prodrive option you can think of has been added as standard on the RB320

 Model
RB320
Overall Length mm
4465
Overall Width mm
1740
Overall Height mm
1440
Wheelbase mm
2540
Kerb Weight kg
1495
 
Engine Size cc
2457
Max Output bhp @ RPM
320@6000
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
332@3700
0-60 sec
4.8
0-100 sec
12.2
Top Speed mph
155(estimated)
 
Number of models
320
Cost
£29,995

Back to top

 P2 - 2005 (Prototype, not in production)

Prototype vehicle made by prodrive. Initial runours hoped it woudl be the next Impreza, but it was purely a prototype, never to be put into production. Pity it was pretty sticky in the bends!

Back to top

 WR1 - 2004

In 2004, the Subaru World Rally Team finally got back to winning Rally Championships thanks to Petter Solberg and traditionally released a Special Edition Subaru Impreza to celebrate, in the form of the WR1. Based on the latest Subaru Impreza WRX STi the WR1 also had the added Prodrive Performance Pack PPP Which makes this the most powerful and fastest Subaru Impreza you can buy off the shelf!

 Model
WR1
Subaru Impreza WR1
Overall Length mm
4415
Overall Width mm
1740
Overall Height mm
1415
Wheelbase mm
2525
Kerb Weight kg
1470
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
315@5800
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
309@4000
0-60 sec
4.25
0-100 sec
10.67
Top Speed mph
155
 
Number of models
500
Cost
£29,995

Back to top

 UK300 - 2001

After a gap of no special editions. Subaru came back in 2001 with a new shaped Subaru Impreza, a new World Rally Title, with the help of Richard Burns , and a therefore a new Special edition in the form of then UK300.

 Model
UK300
Overall Length mm
4405
Overall Width mm
1730
Overall Height mm
1440
Wheelbase mm
2525
Kerb Weight kg
1385
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
215@5600
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
215@3600
0-60 sec
5.9
0-100 sec
unknown
Top Speed mph
143
 
Number of models
300
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 P1 - 1999

The second special edition to be released in 1999 was the P1, which was more to do with Prodrive than Subaru directly. Prodrive is the company that develops the Impreza's for the World Rally Teams, so they know a thing or two about the Subaru Impreza. Therefore, they decided to release their own special edition Impreza. P1.

 Model
P1
Subaru Impreza P1
Overall Length mm
4350
Overall Width mm
1690
Overall Height mm
1400
Wheelbase mm
2520
Kerb Weight kg
1295
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
276@6500
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
253@4000
0-60 sec
4.66
0-100 sec
12.3
Top Speed mph
155
 
Number of models
1,000
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 RB5 - 1999

In 1999 Subaru released two new special edition Subaru Impreza's. The first of those was the RB5. This was to celebrate the new driver lineup with Richard Burns.

 Model
RB5
Subaru Impreza RB5
Overall Length mm
4350
Overall Width mm
1690
Overall Height mm
1400
Wheelbase mm
2520
Kerb Weight kg
1235
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
215@5600
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
214@4000
0-60 sec
4.7
0-100 sec
13.0
Top Speed mph
149
 
Number of models
444
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 22B - 1998

Often considered the best Subaru Impreza ever. The Impreza 22B was released in 1998 and came with a new 2.2litre engine. Although overall power was the same torque was improved to to the larger capacity. The 22B was also dresses in 2-door coupe form unlike previous 4-door Impreza's

 Model
22B
Subaru Impreza 22B
Overall Length mm
4365
Overall Width mm
1770
Overall Height mm
1170
Wheelbase mm
2520
Kerb Weight kg
1302
 
Engine Size cc
2212
Max Output bhp @ RPM
276@6000
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
268@3200
0-60 sec
4.7
0-100 sec
13.0
Top Speed mph
149
 
Number of models
400
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 Terzo - 1997

The Subaru Impreza Terzo was released in 1997 in order to celebrate a hat-trick of championship wins for the Subaru 555 World Rally Team.

 Model
Terzo

Overall Length mm
unknown
Overall Width mm
unknown
Overall Height mm
unknown
Wheelbase mm
unknown
Kerb Weight kg
unknown
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
208@5600
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
214@4000
0-60 sec
unknown
0-100 sec
unknown
Top Speed mph
unknown
 
Number of models
333
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 Catalunya - 1996

Celebrating Subaru's second World Rally Championship title in 1996, The Catalunya Subaru Impreza.

 Model
Catalunya
Overall Length mm
unknown
Overall Width mm
unknown
Overall Height mm
unknown
Wheelbase mm
unknown
Kerb Weight kg
unknown
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
208@5600
Max Torque Nm @ RPM
214@4000
0-60
unknown
0-100
unknown
Top Speed
unknown
 
Number of models
unknown
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 Series McRae - 1995

The Series McRae Subaru Impreza was released in late 1995 to celebrate the achievement of the Subaru 555 World Rally team and Colin McRae winning the World Rally Championship for the first time for both driver and manufacturer.

 Model
Series McRae
Overall Length mm
3230
Overall Width mm
1690
Overall Height mm
1440
Wheelbase mm
2520
Kerb Weight kg
unknown
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
unknown
Max Torque Nm @ RPM
unknown
0-60
unknown
0-100
unknown
Top Speed
unknown
 
Number of models
200
Cost
unknown

Back to top

<< PREV
Google



 

..:: Featured Motoring News feed

 Autocar RSS Feed

Zenos Cars reveals more powerful E10 S for 2015
Zenos Cars reveals more powerful E10 S for 2015 Higher-powered E10 S costs £29,995 and is powered by a 2.0-litre Ford EcoBoost engine developing 250bhp

Zenos cars has revealed a more powerful version of its E10 sports car, dubbed the E10 S.

Priced at £29,995 - £5000 more than the standard E10 - the E10 S is powered by a mid-mounted 2.0-litre Ford GDTI EcoBoost engine producing 250bhp. By comparison, the standard E10 gets 197bhp from its naturally-aspirated 2.0-litre Ford GDI engine. A range of transmission options are available.

Zenos says the E10 S is capable of covering the 0-60mph sprint in less than 4.5 seconds, with a top speed of 135mph. Available in both left and right-hand drive, the E10 S keeps the same styling as the standard E10, and is also road-legal.

Like its sibling, the E10 S is based around an aluminium extrusion and carbon tub construction, which keeps overall weight down as well as increasing torsional rigidity. 

A track pack, consisting of six-speed transmission, limited-slip differential, Zenos-designed composite seats, four-point racing harness, quick release steering wheel, new wheels, heated driver's seat and adjustable dampers raises the total price to £32,995.

Company co-founder and former Caterham Cars CEO Ansar Ali told Autocar that customers who had already put down deposits for the E10 were offered the chance to upgrade to the E10 S, with most taking the chance. The firm plans to start production of both the E10 and E10 S in January next year, with first deliveries planned for early March.

The E10 is the first of three models from Zenos cars to be introduced over the next five years. Also planned is the E11 roadster and E12 coupé, which are due to arrive in 2016 and 2018 respectively. Both will use the same aluminium extrusion structure as the E10.

Get the latest car news, reviews and galleries from Autocar direct to your inbox every week. Enter your email address below:

Tracking the best anti-theft devices for our cars
Tracking the best anti-theft devices for our cars High-tech systems for securing vehicles are all well and good, but sometimes more rudimentary solutions are called for

I do love an infographic. It?s like the Internet for grown ups, or for those who didn?t even bother to get dial-up.

So I was fascinated by the infographic that stolen vehicle recovery specialist Tracker sent out which updated me on the £859,500 worth of vehicles the company's devices recovered in July 2014 alone.

What the little pictures told me is that three arrests had been made, which is jolly good. However 19 of the 44 'stolen recovereds' had actually been nicked with their keys.

That is slightly depressing. We should take rather better care of our keys. Even though it is possible for nearby thieves to log all the digital information in the ether and nick our cars anyway. That would account for the other 25 then.

We do need to go back to basics.

Perhaps the simplest deterrent is to keep a yappy dog in the house? You know, the terriers that jump up at the window and go bonkers when all you want to is park nearby.

I think we need a return to great big lumps of metal bolted to steering wheels, or maybe just exterior wheels. At the very least we need an ignition cut off. I?ve gone for those on my older motors.

I think that we need something basic and primeval that can at least bamboozle high-tech thievery. Oh yes, and would even flummox the thief who is lucky enough to purloin the keys.

I was chatting to a friend who has Land Rover 90, which has been pretty much rebuilt, and he really should be keeping a close eye on it. Land Rovers ? be they classic-era ones or the latest Range Rover kit like the £80k Sport that Tracker recovered in July ? are very stealable.

My mate though has knocked off the immobilser and alarm because they both started to play up. So it is currently unprotected. How mad is that?

So Tracker-style devices aside, what old school anti-theft stuff should we be spannering and plumbing in to our motors?

Porsche Boxster GTS UK first drive review
Porsche Boxster GTS UK first drive review Go-faster Boxster renders the Boxster S entirely redundant, but not the slower but still sweet basic model The new top-range Porsche Boxster, a car that gets the hallowed GTS badge slapped on its rump - first used by the iconic 904GTS half a century ago - and for which Porsche is asking only an additional £5840.In Porsche terms £5840 is not a lot of money. You can spend over half that much just choosing metallic paint, sat nav and a digital radio from the Boxster?s options list. But that?s also the price Porsche is asking to trade up from a standard Boxster S to this new GTS model.In pure equipment terms it seems there is very little choice to be made here: if you gave a Boxster S the Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM), 20-inch rims, the Sport Chrono Pack, sports seats and dynamic headlights the GTS offers as standard, you?d already have burned through almost all the additional money.That?s without considering the GTS?s additional 15bhp, 10lb ft of torque, unique suspension tune and standard active engine mounts. The GTS also comes with a mildly revised front bumper and rear valence of the squint-and-you?ll-see-it variety.It costs £52,879 which might seem like a lot for Boxster but really isn?t very much at all when you consider it?s £30,000 less than Porsche will charge you for the cheapest 911 cabrio, a car powered by near enough the same engine but is slower because of its extra weight, whatever the official figures might say.The other reason for choosing a GTS over an S is perhaps less rational, but no less real for that. The very existence of the GTS demotes the S from the top of the range offering to a middle order car, and for convertible buyers who like not only to be seen, but to be seen in the best, that?s a privilege for which £5840 may seem like a very small price to pay.

A supercar for the weekend? You'd better think twice
A supercar for the weekend? You'd better think twice Taking a Lamborghini Huracán for the weekend might be your idea of heaven, but it requires special considerations to be used in the real world

Fancy a supercar for the weekend? A dream come true, right? Well, yes and no. Even in the hallowed halls of Autocar, the offer of a truly silly set of keys isn?t a particularly common occurrence, and it?s all-too easy to grab at them without a single salient thought in your head (other than "gimme" of course). 

Experience slowly teaches you otherwise. There are a number of questions you ought to have answers for before you potentially turn an unexpectedly brilliant Friday night into a penitent Monday morning. I?ll use a recent three-day dalliance with the Lamborghini Huracán to illustrate. 

1) Do you have anywhere you actually need to go? 

Obviously you?re going to be ?going? lots of places. It?s likely you won?t consider anywhere too far away. In a Porsche 911 GT3, I once chose to buy a bag of cement from Norwich. But wherever you go, you won?t want to stop for very long, or go very far. Walking away from an attention magnet like the Huracán is a test of faith in human nature.

Mine, apparently, is very limited. You have to be the son of a Russian oligarch or seventeenth in line to the Saudi throne to comfortably ditch a supercar on the side of the road. Leaving the Huracán in Lidl?s car park for ten minutes was my limit. 

2) Wherever you do go, do you mind being the centre of attention? 

Because this is going to happen a lot. Especially, it would seem, in a matt black Huracán. In a high street, it's almost a given that almost any supercar is going to turn the heads of dads/adolescents/adolescent dads, but Lamborghini?s new charge generates untold levels of interest. ?They look like they?ve seen a naked woman,? the Mrs memorably remarked in Richmond.

?They? also weren?t above swerving in front of the car for the perfect camera phone shot or forming a crowd at a motorway petrol station. It?s all thoroughly jolly, but be prepared to wear out your waving arm and do some chatting. 

3) Do you have to get it over anything bigger than a matchbox to park at home? 

Well, then you?ll have to check it has a nose-raiser installed. My current driveway is up a gentle slope you wouldn?t normally concern yourself about in anything else, but in a supercar it might as well be an anti-tank obstacle.

Even without that kind of impediment outside your front door, you?ll find yourself cringing at sleeping policeman. Fortunately, the Huracán had the ability to pick up its skirt in seconds. 

4) Can you face scrutiny of real policeman?

Because this isn?t out the question. Not by a long shot. Even if you manage to stay within the same galaxy as whatever speed limit you happen to be (probably accidentally) breaking, the law will likely take a deep and abiding interest in you.

And if you happen to be heading toward the coast under the cover of darkness in an Italian-registered, right-hand-drive Lamborghini, that interest will inevitably turn into a compulsive need to have a chat. 

5) Do you have the correct documents?

A boring, book-keeping exercise, but one that becomes enormously significant when you?re standing on a verge explaining to plod why you?re in a Lamborghini you don?t own in the middle of the night. When the word ?impounded? appears in the conversation, the requirement becomes pivotal.

Press cars, especially those blessed with number plates the local constabulary can?t interrogate, come with necessary information tucked in the glovebox. But your Italian better be up to scratch if you want to help them decipher the difference between a registration document and the insurance. 

6) Are you prepared for the cost?

Ah yes, the insurance. Being handed a supercar is like being loaned anything else expensive ? it tends to come with an awful lot of clauses.

Borrowing a car from a manufacturer for the purposes of writing about it is perhaps the least bothersome way of borrowing an automobile ever devised ? however, even for scribblers significantly more seasoned than myself there is still the excess to worry about.

Lamborghini?s policy, it turns out, is actually very accommodating. But another manufacturer I can think of will expect a £1000 payout for each rim curbed. Cringe. 

7) Are you prepared for a workout?

It must be said, the Huracán is a fantastically easy car to drive about in normally. In Auto mode its gearbox is easygoing and the V10, although chattery, is incredibly docile at low speeds.

But you won?t want to drive it normally all the time ? at some point you?ll go all devil-may-care and want to launch about the place. Which is fine and lovely, and what it?s all about ? although that doesn?t stop it being an utterly physical experience.

Get the bit properly between your teeth (admittedly inadvisable on the public road) and it won?t be long before the remarkable all-wheel grip has your core and neck muscles are straining at the effort of keeping you upright. Factor in your heart rate and the tummy-butterfly effect of that V10, and you?ll wish you brought a towel along. 

8) Is it really, at the end of the day, going to be worth all the hassle?

Yes, absolutely. 

New Renault Alpine family to follow sports car
New Renault Alpine family to follow sports car Renault design boss confirms design work on new Alpine car is almost complete, with plans for more cars to follow if the car is well received

Renault?s upcoming Alpine sports car will be used to assess a business case for a wider family of models, according to the firm?s design boss Laurens van den Acker.

Speaking to Autocar at the Moscow motor show, van den Acker said there was ?a hope? that the sports car would spearhead a range of Alpine-branded vehicles when it goes on sale in 2016. 

?As with many things we need to have a good business first. We all love Alpines but we all want to make money as well. Let?s get the first car right and then I hope I can start doing Alpines for the rest of my life,? he said

Design work on the car is understood to be at an advanced stage, and although delays were caused by Caterham?s departure from the project senior executives have already signed off the car?s styling. ?Carlos Ghosn [Renault-Nissan boss] has seen the car and he?s happy,? said van den Acker.

Final details are being kept closely under wraps, as van den Acker admits ?I?ve been a bit cagey to talk too much about it. Sports cars are an endangered species ? there are always ten reasons not to do it.?

Late-stage engineering mules of the Alpine model are about to hit the roads, with Renaultsport boss Patrice Ratti saying the car will be ?more about driving pleasure than pure power?.

Ratti also warned the near production-ready model ? which is tipped to get 250bhp ? doesn?t look anything like the Alpine concept car revealed at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in 2012. 

Get the latest car news, reviews and galleries from Autocar direct to your inbox every week. Enter your email address below:

Back to top

 


Home | Website Directory | Contact | Link 2 Us | Sitemap

~ Copyright 1999 - 2014 Alan Addison, ScoUK.net - All Rights Reserved ~

page constructed in 1.671 seconds