ScoUK.net
DigiGuide, the best TV guide
Home Rallying Subaru Impreza Colin McRae MBE Projects Entertainment Photo Gallery Contact Directory
 ScoUK.net > subaru-impreza > Special Edtions - RB320 P2 UK300 P1 WR1 RB5 22B Translate:     
Saturday, 20 September, 2014 - 21:00 (UK)  

 Subaru Impreza




Subaru Impreza Story
An Introduction to the Subaru Impreza


History of the Impreza
A complete History of Subaru and the Impreza


Special Editions
All the UK special edition Impreza's listed here


My 2001 Impreza WRX
My own 2001 Impreza WRX in Red Mica


Project PPP
Upgraded my WRX with PPP saving nearly £1,200!


Scooby @ Lochindorb
Photo gallery of the car at Lochindorb Jan08


Photo Gallery
MY08 Impreza (Gallery)
MY06 Impreza (Gallery)
MY03 Impreza (Gallery)

 

Search the web



My Other Sites

 
ScoUK.net
You are here :)

MorayScoobies.co.uk
Local Regional website for Subaru Impreza Drivers Club Members

Broadband4 Lhanbryde.co.uk
Campaign website devoted to bringing ADSL Broadband to Lhanbryde

MorayIAM.org.uk
Moray Group of Advanced Motorists

motoringBible.com
on-line resource of motoring related articles sent in by visitors

MorayRoadSafety
Motoring website helping to make Moray roads a little bit safer for all! -

Support .sco TLD
www.dotsco.org

..:: The Subaru Impreza Story

1. The Subaru Impreza Story, as told by me
2. The History of the Subaru Impreza
3. Special Editions
4. Image Galleries
5. My 2001 Subaru Impreza WRX - Red Mica


..:: Special Editions - RB320, P2, WR1, UK300, P1, RB5, 22B & more

Here we have the complete list of Special Edition Subaru Impreza's were/are available in the UK. There have been many more editions released world wide, but here is the list of UK models along with there specifications.

       

 RB320 - 2007

November 2006, exactly one year after the sad death of Richard Burns from a brain tumour. Subaru UK announced a new special edition of their MY06 Subaru Impreza WRX STi. The RB320 is packaged in Obsidian black, with bespoke black alloys. May not be to everyone's liking but I think it looks fantastic and appropriate for the anniversary. The RB320 is no limited edition paint job, as the name suggests the RB320 delivers around 320bhp from it's WRX STi PPP package. That's a lot of oomph!! Added to that just about every subaru/prodrive option you can think of has been added as standard on the RB320

 Model
RB320
Overall Length mm
4465
Overall Width mm
1740
Overall Height mm
1440
Wheelbase mm
2540
Kerb Weight kg
1495
 
Engine Size cc
2457
Max Output bhp @ RPM
320@6000
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
332@3700
0-60 sec
4.8
0-100 sec
12.2
Top Speed mph
155(estimated)
 
Number of models
320
Cost
£29,995

Back to top

 P2 - 2005 (Prototype, not in production)

Prototype vehicle made by prodrive. Initial runours hoped it woudl be the next Impreza, but it was purely a prototype, never to be put into production. Pity it was pretty sticky in the bends!

Back to top

 WR1 - 2004

In 2004, the Subaru World Rally Team finally got back to winning Rally Championships thanks to Petter Solberg and traditionally released a Special Edition Subaru Impreza to celebrate, in the form of the WR1. Based on the latest Subaru Impreza WRX STi the WR1 also had the added Prodrive Performance Pack PPP Which makes this the most powerful and fastest Subaru Impreza you can buy off the shelf!

 Model
WR1
Subaru Impreza WR1
Overall Length mm
4415
Overall Width mm
1740
Overall Height mm
1415
Wheelbase mm
2525
Kerb Weight kg
1470
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
315@5800
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
309@4000
0-60 sec
4.25
0-100 sec
10.67
Top Speed mph
155
 
Number of models
500
Cost
£29,995

Back to top

 UK300 - 2001

After a gap of no special editions. Subaru came back in 2001 with a new shaped Subaru Impreza, a new World Rally Title, with the help of Richard Burns , and a therefore a new Special edition in the form of then UK300.

 Model
UK300
Overall Length mm
4405
Overall Width mm
1730
Overall Height mm
1440
Wheelbase mm
2525
Kerb Weight kg
1385
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
215@5600
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
215@3600
0-60 sec
5.9
0-100 sec
unknown
Top Speed mph
143
 
Number of models
300
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 P1 - 1999

The second special edition to be released in 1999 was the P1, which was more to do with Prodrive than Subaru directly. Prodrive is the company that develops the Impreza's for the World Rally Teams, so they know a thing or two about the Subaru Impreza. Therefore, they decided to release their own special edition Impreza. P1.

 Model
P1
Subaru Impreza P1
Overall Length mm
4350
Overall Width mm
1690
Overall Height mm
1400
Wheelbase mm
2520
Kerb Weight kg
1295
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
276@6500
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
253@4000
0-60 sec
4.66
0-100 sec
12.3
Top Speed mph
155
 
Number of models
1,000
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 RB5 - 1999

In 1999 Subaru released two new special edition Subaru Impreza's. The first of those was the RB5. This was to celebrate the new driver lineup with Richard Burns.

 Model
RB5
Subaru Impreza RB5
Overall Length mm
4350
Overall Width mm
1690
Overall Height mm
1400
Wheelbase mm
2520
Kerb Weight kg
1235
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
215@5600
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
214@4000
0-60 sec
4.7
0-100 sec
13.0
Top Speed mph
149
 
Number of models
444
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 22B - 1998

Often considered the best Subaru Impreza ever. The Impreza 22B was released in 1998 and came with a new 2.2litre engine. Although overall power was the same torque was improved to to the larger capacity. The 22B was also dresses in 2-door coupe form unlike previous 4-door Impreza's

 Model
22B
Subaru Impreza 22B
Overall Length mm
4365
Overall Width mm
1770
Overall Height mm
1170
Wheelbase mm
2520
Kerb Weight kg
1302
 
Engine Size cc
2212
Max Output bhp @ RPM
276@6000
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
268@3200
0-60 sec
4.7
0-100 sec
13.0
Top Speed mph
149
 
Number of models
400
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 Terzo - 1997

The Subaru Impreza Terzo was released in 1997 in order to celebrate a hat-trick of championship wins for the Subaru 555 World Rally Team.

 Model
Terzo

Overall Length mm
unknown
Overall Width mm
unknown
Overall Height mm
unknown
Wheelbase mm
unknown
Kerb Weight kg
unknown
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
208@5600
Max Torque lb/ft @ RPM
214@4000
0-60 sec
unknown
0-100 sec
unknown
Top Speed mph
unknown
 
Number of models
333
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 Catalunya - 1996

Celebrating Subaru's second World Rally Championship title in 1996, The Catalunya Subaru Impreza.

 Model
Catalunya
Overall Length mm
unknown
Overall Width mm
unknown
Overall Height mm
unknown
Wheelbase mm
unknown
Kerb Weight kg
unknown
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
208@5600
Max Torque Nm @ RPM
214@4000
0-60
unknown
0-100
unknown
Top Speed
unknown
 
Number of models
unknown
Cost
unknown

Back to top

 Series McRae - 1995

The Series McRae Subaru Impreza was released in late 1995 to celebrate the achievement of the Subaru 555 World Rally team and Colin McRae winning the World Rally Championship for the first time for both driver and manufacturer.

 Model
Series McRae
Overall Length mm
3230
Overall Width mm
1690
Overall Height mm
1440
Wheelbase mm
2520
Kerb Weight kg
unknown
 
Engine Size cc
1994
Max Output bhp @ RPM
unknown
Max Torque Nm @ RPM
unknown
0-60
unknown
0-100
unknown
Top Speed
unknown
 
Number of models
200
Cost
unknown

Back to top

<< PREV
Google



 

..:: Featured Motoring News feed

 Autocar RSS Feed

Peugeot looks to sporty core models, leaving RCZ's future uncertain
Peugeot looks to sporty core models, leaving RCZ's future uncertain Peugeot's Audi TT-rivalling RCZ could be a victim of PSA boss Carlos Tavares's global model cull

PSA boss Carlos Tavares has refused to confirm that Peugeot will replace the Audi TT-rivalling RCZ

"It still has a couple of years to go," he said "and we are going to concentrate on making sporty derivatives of mainstream models." That means projects such as the forthcoming 308 R will be given priority.

He also ruled out the chances of Peugeot returning to making other more exotic sports cars, despite the company previewing such models with a variety of recent concept cars, including last year?s Exalt.

Since joining the company at the end of last year Tavares has been on a mission to reduce the numbers of models sold by Citroën, DS and Peugeot and the complexity of platforms. His aim is to reduce global models from 45 to 26, built on just two platforms, raising the possibility that the RCZ replacement maybe a victim of this cull. 

Tavares did confirm however that the company was pressing on with other technologies. "An EV is a few years away but they?re only useful as commuter cars. We really want to do petrol plug-in hybrids for family cars and long-distance journeys."

However, he also revealed that the radical Hybrid Air technology previewed by both Citroën and Peugeot "has no business case at the moment as we need to share it with another car maker."

Get the latest car news, reviews and galleries from Autocar direct to your inbox every week. Enter your email address below:

Comparison: Porsche Cayman GTS versus Jaguar F-type coupe
Comparison: Porsche Cayman GTS versus Jaguar F-type coupe Few £60k cars can live with a Jaguar F-type V6 S coupé. Is the Porsche Cayman GTS one of them?

Should you ever need proof that sports cars are getting better with every minute nowadays, the two you are looking at above will provide it with more than a little room to spare.

Because what strikes you about the Porsche Cayman GTS and Jaguar F-type V6 S coupé ? especially when they?re lined up beside one another, sporting similarly bright red paintwork, waiting metaphorically to lock horns ? is that they are both such lovely-looking cars.

Deciding which one might be the better of the two is therefore likely to be an exercise in semantics, because this is a contest in which personal taste is always going to count for much.

However, there are key differences between them ? quite dramatic ones in some cases. Besides, we at Autocar have never been all that happy to deliver a ?horses for courses? type of verdict, so separate them we shall attempt to do.

But before any opinion about what they do and how they differ from one another subjectively, let?s work out what they?ve got and how much they actually cost ? because even here, there are elements that are far from straightforward. 

The Cayman GTS, for instance, costs a seemingly fine-value £55,397 in its basic form, for which you get a 336bhp version of Porsche?s 3.4-litre flat six engine, an uprated chassis, PASM (Porsche?s electronic damping control system) as standard and a six-speed manual gearbox, among other goodies.

Factor in the options fitted to the test car, though ? which include carbon-ceramic brakes, sports bucket seats, a limited-slip diff with torque vectoring and the no-cost optional sports chassis ? and the price of the GTS soon heads towards the wrong side of £70k.

Read the Porsche Cayman GTS first drive review

And at that point, the F-type V6 S coupé, which initially appears to be the pricier of the two, at a whisker over £60k, actually becomes nothing of the sort.

Why? Because the Jaguar comes as standard with an eight-speed automatic gearbox, a limited-slip diff and a far better-appointed cabin, featuring most of the elements you need to pay extra for in the Cayman straight out of the showroom.

In reality, therefore, it is the Jaguar that is the cheaper of the two ? by about £5k if you spec them like for like. So right there is one reasonably big difference to bear in mind.

As, of course, is the fact that the Jaguar?s V6 engine is supercharged and sits squarely between the front wheels, whereas the Cayman?s flat six is atmospheric and nestles lower in its chassis, behind the seats but well in front of the rear axle.

Front-engined versus mid-engined, supercharging versus atmo, manual gearbox versus automatic? already a picture is starting to emerge.

And yet still we haven?t mentioned arguably the biggest difference of all between them on the spec sheet: how much they weigh. Bottom line, despite Jaguar?s latest and greatest sports car featuring all sorts of exotic materials, the F-type coupé still weighs 249kg more than the Cayman GTS.

So whenever the Jaguar tries to stop for, or turn in to, or accelerate out of a corner, it will always be carrying the equivalent of an extra three decent-sized passengers, even though it is a mere two-seater like the Porsche. And that?s a huge advantage to give away before you?ve so much as turned a wheel against one of the sweetest-driving sports cars there has ever been.

There are plenty of ways in which the F-type can and does hit back, of course, all of which we?ll come to in a while. But that fundamental difference between them, a full quarter of a tonne of extra kerb weight, never fully goes away, no matter how much more delicious its exhaust note may be, or how much extra power and torque it develops.

Interestingly, the Jaguar definitely feels, and indeed is, marginally the quicker of the two in a straight line where it counts. Ignore the 0-60mph times, because these include the extra benefit of the Cayman?s superior initial traction when leaving the line, and instead consider the more realistic scenario of being in second gear and then nailing it all the way up to the top of fourth.

Side by side ? and we did just this at the track ? the Jaguar more than has the edge, which is surprising, perhaps, until you consider the following.

One, the F-type has a lot more torque to call upon ? 339lb ft between 3500rpm and 5000rpm against 280lb ft for the Cayman, which doesn?t even register until 4750rpm. 

Two, the ratios within its eight-speed gearbox are shorter and stacked more closely in the Jag than they are in the surprisingly long-geared Porsche.

Also, the gearbox itself shifts that little bit quicker than any human could in a manual Cayman. Ticking the box marked ?PDK? in the Cayman would add an extra ratio and bring a touch more kaboom to its mid-range acceleration, true, but it would also add yet more thousands to the price of the already pricier GTS.

What?s more, the Jaguar?s supercharged V6 emits a cartoonishly magnificent noise at 5000rpm and beyond, one that eclipses even the GTS for pure bravado, even if the Porsche does make a deeply menacing sound all of its own. As with their styling, the F-type is more extrovert in its performance.

It howls and screams and goes that little bit harder in the process. That said, the Cayman has the higher top speed ? 177mph versus 171mph ? and is fractionally the cleaner, at 211g/km versus 213g/km.

You find yourself driving them in quite different ways in order to get the most out of them. The Porsche needs revs and only really reveals its true colours on the far side of 6000rpm.

Up until then it feels merely rapid, but over the final 2000rpm it goes delightfully berserk. The throttle response becomes ultra-sharp, which has a knock-on effect on the chassis that we?ll come to. At its peak, the GTS feels every inch as fast as the Jaguar.

But because the Jaguar requires less effort to get more out of generally, it always feels more potent than the Cayman.

Read the Jaguar F-type coupé review

More energy is unleashed via far less throttle in the F-type, and you can find yourself driving it very quickly across country almost without realising ? whereas in the Cayman, every extra mile per hour requires an increase in both physical and mental effort. The Porsche feels more intimate and intense as a result, the Jaguar less manic and more relaxed.

It?s not quite like that with their handling, steering, ride and braking qualities, though, because in all of these areas the Cayman consistently has the edge.

In isolation, the Jaguar has pretty decent steering, with a meaty kind of response to its broad leather rim that enables you to place the nose of the car in any corner just so. And it neither understeers nor oversteers to any great degree, either (unlike the V8 F-type coupé, which is maybe a bit too lively for its own good at the rear in some circumstances) and it stops about as well as you could wish for in a 1600kg sports car.

But however sharp and agile and composed the F-type feels, the Cayman instantly seems that much more incisive when you climb from one to the other and drive it through the same set of corners.

You get the immediate impression that there is simply less car to maintain control of, and by that I mean less inertia to keep in check, less body roll to deal with and less space required in which to slow down or change direction or aim at the next apex. The Cayman just needs less room in which to operate, basically, and yet it has more grip mid-corner and feels a fair bit more adjustable via the throttle.

And right at the top of its game, if you?re prepared to stand firm on the edge of the cliff and then look down into the abyss, the Cayman can do things that the F-type can merely dream about. Between 5500rpm and its 7900rpm cut-out, the Cayman?s engine becomes so responsive that it actually alters the whole feel of the chassis.

Up at 5500rpm and beyond, every thousandth of an inch of movement on the throttle unleashes an extra hit of energy through the rear tyres, in turn increasing the sense of response beneath your backside. 

Get right in tune with this car and you can steer it on the throttle as much as you can via the steering wheel itself, assuming that there is the space in which to do so.

I?d not recommend going that far on the road too often, but on a track it becomes a defining factor of the GTS. It?s the reason why, sometimes, you will climb out of this car chuckling to yourself, giddy about what it will let you get away with. 

For a mid-engined sports car, its level of forgiveness is extraordinary, yet at the same time it feels as sharp as a razor blade, fresh from the packet.

The verdict

As a combination, allied to the GTS model?s stunning good looks, beautifully made cabin and fabulous flat six engine, this Porsche makes for one heck of a package, even if that package is on the wrong side of expensive once all the right options have been added.

And it?s enough of a package overall to leave the Jaguar not so much reeling in defeat as blinded by the genius of the GTS. The F-type does very few things wrong and most things very well indeed.

It looks sensational inside and out, goes hard, sounds great, stop well, handles entertainingly, steers properly, costs slightly less in real terms and is significantly better equipped. It also rides a touch more comfortably (although the GTS somehow manages to ride pretty well on the road, too) and is marginally quicker where it counts.

No, the Jaguar loses out in the end only because it finds itself trying to compete with one of the sweetest road cars that Porsche has ever produced.

That?s how good the Cayman GTS is, truly, so the fact that the F-type runs it close is testament to how fine a job Jaguar has done in this case ? because on any other day, against any other rival, the F-type coupé V6 S would walk it. But not today ? not against a car as exceptional as this.

Read Autocar's previous comparison - Nissan X-Trail versus seven-seat competition

Porsche Cayman GTS

Price £55,397; Top speed 177mph; 0-62mph 4.6sec; Economy 31.4mpg; CO2 211g/km; Kerb weight 1345kg; Engine 6-cyls horizontally opposed, 3436cc, petrol; Power 336bhp at 7400rpm; Torque 280lb ft at 4750rpm; Gearbox 6-speed manual 

Jaguar F-type V6 S coupé

Price £60,250; Top speed 171mph; 0-62mph 4.8sec; Economy 31.0mpg; CO2 213g/km; Kerb weight 1594kg; Engine V6, 2995cc, supercharged, petrol; Power 375bhp at 6500rpm; Torque 339lb ft at 3500-5000rpm; Gearbox 8-speed automatic

Get the latest car news, reviews and galleries from Autocar direct to your inbox every week. Enter your email address below:

JLR to offer world-first laser HUD tech on Range Rover Evoque
JLR to offer world-first laser HUD tech on Range Rover Evoque Baby Range Rover SUV first to get clearer, brighter head-up display tech - will be shown in Paris but can be ordered now

Jaguar Land Rover is pioneering the use of laser head-up display units by offering them as options on the Range Rover Evoque.

Available to order now as a £1000 option, the technology - a world first - was shown to media earlier this summer, and could allow for a vast range of secondary driving information to be projected onto the windscreen of a car in the future. 

While the units on offer in the Evoque will only be used to display information such as road speed, gear position, navigation and traffic data, cruise control status and system warnings for the moment, more applications could follow should the technology prove a hit.

JLR's initial 'virtual windscreen' concepts - where the entire windscreen space is used to display projected information - showed a car on track timing itself against a 'ghost' car projected onto the windscreen. Such uses are likely to be a long way off, though.

The laser HUD system is claimed to be vastly superior to rival units, as laser holographic projection allows for a clearer, brighter image to be displayed in front of the driver.

JLR will show the system on its new SW1 Range Rover Evoque models at the Paris motor show. The special edition will open for orders mid-October and is destined for Asian markets, but not the UK. It features new 20-inch alloy wheels, Union flag graphics and leather trim inside with contrasting stitching.

Get the latest car news, reviews and galleries from Autocar direct to your inbox every week. Enter your email address below:

Infiniti boss sets out expansion plans
Infiniti boss sets out expansion plans Nissan's luxury arm reveals plans for a glut of new models to gain traction in Europe and fight premium German rivals like BMW and Audi

Infiniti is set to hugely expand its model line-up in a bid to properly match BMW and Audi, according to the brand?s European boss, Francois Goupil de Bouille.

The company is planning to rapidly increase the number and quality of its products in order to finally succeed in Europe where it has so far failed to gain real traction.

Speaking at the opening of Infiniti?s new London design studio de Bouille told Autocar: "We want to be a member of the premium club and in five to eight years we want to be a major act in this business."

Nissan?s global design director Shiro Nakamura acknowledged that design was at the centre of the brand?s renewed push and showed the assembled media an illustration hinting that the eventual line-up would include 10 models, topped off by the Q80 luxury four-seater that will be shown in concept form at next month?s Paris motor show.

The expanded range will also include a smaller coupé that?s likely to be based on the Q50 saloon.

The next confirmed production car will be the Audi A3-rivalling Q30 that will go on sale next summer and be shortly followed by the QX30, which will square up to the Range Rover Evoque and BMW X1.

Get the latest car news, reviews and galleries from Autocar direct to your inbox every week. Enter your email address below:

Future Lotus plans could include new saloon and SUV
Future Lotus plans could include new saloon and SUV New Lotus boss Jean-Marc Gales says the firm will look outside its primary sports car business for new models

Lotus could be building saloon and SUV models within a decade as part of a transformation plan framed in secret over the past few months by its recently-arrived CEO, Jean-Marc Gales, who once led Peugeot. 

The idea was initially leaked on a Malaysian website claiming to be privy to Lotus's boardroom secrets but in an exclusive interview today with Autocar, Gales confirmed that the idea was very much on the table.

Speaking one day after it was revealed that Group Lotus' workforce could be cut by a quarter, a "very sad and regrettable" move that was needed to reshape the company and cut costs for the short term, Gales said his initial aim was to sharply increase sales of Lotus's three existing models - Elise, Exige and Evora - by making them better and increasing dealer spread. 

"You will see many new variants of familiar Lotus models over the next nine months, and even more in the next two years," he said. "Our cars will be faster, better made and more convenient to use but we will keep our relationship with Toyota as an engine partner so the cars will be also be very reliable and easy to own."

However, in the longer term Gales says he sees no reason why what he sees as Lotus's core values - lightness, dynamic ability and unique styling - cannot extend to "cars in other categories than the sports car". Gales does not have to add that the same strategy has already turned Porsche into a hugely profitable automotive powerhouse.

Lotus sales are up 46 per cent so far this year, and the company is confident of selling 2000 units this year, most of them in "good old Europe" though other markets are also looking promising. 

The company has recently opened nine more dealerships worldwide and has plans for a total of 20 within the next few months. Gales believes a reasonable production target with the existing model range is 3000 cars a year. 

He clearly believes a return to profitability is an urgent requirement, but refuses to be tied to a date beyond naming it as a short-term objective.

"I am 100 per cent confident we can get Lotus back to where it was in its greatest days," Gales says, "but it would be foolish to suggest the task will be easy."

Get the latest car news, reviews and galleries from Autocar direct to your inbox every week. Enter your email address below:

Back to top

 


Home | Website Directory | Contact | Link 2 Us | Sitemap

~ Copyright 1999 - 2014 Alan Addison, ScoUK.net - All Rights Reserved ~

page constructed in 0.812 seconds